Citizen Science

What Have We Learned and the Website

Bird populations are always shifting and changing. Find out what the citizen scientists have learned and about other resources on the birdcount.org website.
Citizen Science

What Have We Learned and the Website

Bird populations are always shifting and changing. Find out what the citizen scientists have learned and about other resources on the birdcount.org website.

Bird populations are always shifting and changing. For example, 2009 GBBC data highlighted a huge southern invasion of Pine Siskins across much of the eastern United States. Participants counted 279,469 Pine Siskins on 18,528 checklists, as compared to the previous high of 38,977 birds on 4,069 checklists in 2005. Failure of seed crops farther north caused the Siskins to move south to find their favorite food.

ABOUT THE WEBSITE

In addition to registering and entering your results,  www.birdcount.org web site is a great resource:

  • Explore real-time maps and charts that show what others are reporting during the count.
  • Tips to help identify birds and special materials for educators.
  • Enter the GBBC photo contest by uploading images taken during the count. Many images will be featured in the GBBC website’s photo gallery.

All participants are entered in a drawing for prizes that include bird feeders, binoculars, books, CDs, and many other great birding products.

For more information about the GBBC, visit www.birdcount.org. Or contact the Cornell Lab of Ornithology at (800) 843-2473 or (outside the U.S., call (607) 254-2473) or GBBC at Cornell University, or Audubon at Citizen Science at the Audubon Society or (202) 861-2242 ext 3050.


Learn more about how to take part in the Great Backyard Bird Count at gbbc.birdcount.org.  The GBBC is a joint project of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society with partner Bird Studies Canada, and is made possible in part by sponsor Wild Birds Unlimited.
 

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