Climate Change

New Audubon Science: Half of Wyoming’s Bird Species at Risk of Extinction Due to Climate Change

Enter your zip code into Audubon’s Birds and Climate Visualizer to see how climate change will impact your birds and your community and ways you can help.

FORT COLLINS, Colo. (October 10, 2019) – Today, the National Audubon Society announced a groundbreaking climate report, Survival by Degrees: 389 Bird Species on the Brink. “Two-thirds of America’s birds are threatened with extinction from climate change, but keeping global temperatures down will help up to 76 percent of them. There’s hope in this report, but first, it’ll break your heart if you care about birds and what they tell us about the ecosystems we share with them. It’s a bird emergency,” said David Yarnold, (@david_yarnold), CEO and president of Audubon.

“More than half of Wyoming’s bird species are threatened with extinction from climate change. Wyoming icons such as the Greater Sage-Grouse, Lark Bunting, and Mountain Chickadee are among the species most threatened by climate change,” said Alison Holloran, executive director of Audubon Rockies, the regional Audubon office for Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado.

Extreme spring heat is the climate-related threat affecting the most species in Wyoming, followed by fire weather. “This is not just a bird issue. The threats facing our birds, such as increased wildfire and drought, also threaten the forests and rivers that Wyoming’s communities and economy depend on,” said Holloran.

Audubon scientists studied 604 North American bird species using 140 million bird records, including observational data from bird lovers and field biologists across the country.

They used these data to create Audubon’s zip code-based tool, the Birds and Climate Visualizer, which helps users understand the impacts to birds where they live, making climate change even more local, immediate and, for tens of millions of bird fans, deeply personal. 

“As a lover of Wyoming’s grasslands and sagebrush steppe, Lark Buntings have always been one of my favorite birds. To me, they symbolize the abundant natural beauty of Wyoming’s plains. The fact that they are in trouble is a serious wakeup call,” said Holloran.

“We already know what we need to do to reduce global warming, and we already have a lot of the tools we need to take those steps. Now, what we need are more people committed to making sure those solutions are put into practice,” said Renee Stone, vice president of climate for the National Audubon Society. “Our elected officials at every level of government must hear from their constituents that this is a priority. Audubon is committed to protecting the places birds need now and in the future and taking action to address the root causes of climate change.”

Audubon has outlined five key steps:

  1. Reduce your use of energy at home and ask your elected officials to support energy-saving policies that reduce the overall demand for electricity and that save consumers money.
  2. Ask your elected officials to expand responsibly-sited, consumer-driven clean energy development that grows jobs in your community–like solar or wind power.
  3. Reduce the amount of carbon pollution released into the atmosphere. In order to drive down carbon emissions, we will need innovative economy-wide solutions that address every sector of the economy–like a fee on carbon. Another option is to address carbon emissions one sector at a time like setting a clean energy standard for electricity generation.
  4. Advocate for natural solutions, from increasing wetlands along coasts and rivers that absorb soaking rains to protecting forests and grasslands that are homes to birds and serve as carbon storage banks, and putting native plants everywhere to help birds adapt to climate change.
  5. Ask elected leaders to be climate and conservation champions.

To learn how you can help Audubon fight climate change in Wyoming through conservation ranching, responsible energy development, native gardening, and environmental education, please visit rockies.audubon.org/climate.

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About Audubon
The National Audubon Society protects birds and the places they need, today and tomorrow. Audubon works throughout the Americas using science, advocacy, education, and on-the-ground conservation. State programs, nature centers, chapters, and partners give Audubon an unparalleled wingspan that reaches millions of people each year to inform, inspire, and unite diverse communities in conservation action. A nonprofit conservation organization since 1905, Audubon believes in a world in which people and wildlife thrive. Learn more at www.audubon.org and on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @audubonsociety.

Audubon Rockies, the regional Audubon office for Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado, conserves and restores natural ecosystems, focusing on birds, other wildlife and their habitats for the benefit of humanity and the earth’s biological diversity. Learn more at rockies.audubon.org and by following us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at @audubonrockies.

Media Contact
Evan Barrientos
ebarrientos@audubon.org
(414) 238-3995

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