Birds and Wildlife

The Rocky Mountain and specifically the Sagebrush ecosystems are experiencing widespread degradation due to a variety of causes and are now some of the most endangered ecosystems in the United States. Audubon is working to reverse this process.

Birding the Rockies
Birds

Birding the Rockies

When it comes down to it, Audubon is for the birds!

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Priority Birds
Birds

Priority Birds

The Central Flyway region is renowned for its iconic western species.

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Birding Festivals and Events
Birds

Birding Festivals and Events

Year round, Wyoming and Colorado have wonderful birding events that inspire a new generation of Auduboners everyday.

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Gunnison Sage-Grouse
Birds

Gunnison Sage-Grouse

The Gunnison Sage-Grouse has disappeared from about 90 percent of its former range, owing to loss and degradation of habitat.

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IBA Site Nomination
Birds

IBA Site Nomination

Sites that regularly support significant breeding or non-breeding densities can be designated an Important Bird Area. Nominate an area today!

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Wyoming Birding Map by Audubon's Zach Hutchinson

Sagebrush Species

Greater Sage-Grouse Photo: Ronan Donovan/Audubon Photography Awards

Sagebrush ecosystems occur in the cold deserts of the Western United States. These deserts are found in the Intermountain region which lies between the Pacific Coast mountain ranges and the Rocky Mountains. The climate of the region is arid to semi-arid and is characterized by long and cold winters and hot and dry summers. Most precipitation falls in winter as snow. Temperatures generally increase from north to south, while the amount of precipitation falling as summer rain increases from west to east. High topographic variability strongly influences local climate and weather patterns.

Small mammals such as pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis) and sagebrush voles (Lemmiscus curtatus), reptiles including the sagebrush lizard (Sceloporus graciosus) birds of prey such as golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos canadensis), and game species such as pronghorn (Antilocapra Americana), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and elk (Cervus canadensis) all rely on sagesteppe habitat. While the diversity of wildlife in sage-steppe ecosystems may be less than other ecotypes such as forests, many species found in sagebrush, such as the Greater sagegrouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) live nowhere else in the world. 

Birds of The Rockies

   

How you can help, right now